Tag Archive | digital creations

Come Smile with Me 13.8.17

Have a great day!
love.

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Agnishatdal Ashar (june) critique by Troy David Loy

Agnishatdal Ashar 1424 Critique by Troy David Loy @ https://www.amazon.com/author/troyloy

Santidev Ghosh:

I’m listening now as I type this, and find his music amazing. While my grasp of Bengali is still somewhat wanting, the intonation, rhythm, and less measurable qualities of his singing place him in my view among some of the greatest performers of his style of his day. Perhaps when my ability with the language is bettered, I’ll be in good position to enjoy it in full. I found a link after a quick search of his name here:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pwLeG19I5Ds The devotion to his teacher marks him as a far more diligent student than many at this point, and his inspiration by Tagore to so carry on his style apparent in his performances.

Sunil Manohar Gavaskar:
I’ve not watched cricket before, but found a recording from a game near the end of his career here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6EMEGQWfZ0s Despite my naivete about the game, I can say that it’s impressive to see him play on the field, and his sportsmanship is evident.

Budapest Missives 3: The Problem with Race:

Juliette makes a good point here, that fear and reviling of the Other doesn’t have to be universal even in nations where it’s common and accepted. We all have our likes and dislikes of certain categories of people, but this is not something that absolutely must be: we can do something about it, to not be the slaves of the more primitive parts of our brains, to not be so motivated by our instinct for tribalism that we lose sight of what makes us more alike than different.

Red Heels Pt. 4:

Our heroine exchanges cameras and pictures with her person of interest, a man with a shared penchant for vintage photography and morning coffee with not-so-strangers. The mention of Rilke was interesting, as I’ve read little of his work, something that may be worth looking up, in English, as the closest I come to knowing any German is the pseudonym of one of my cats, Herr Rickmeister Fluffenhoffer.

Time stands still:

Eleanor offers a beautifully evocative image of what looks like a possibly abandoned storefront with a young boy before it preoccupied with something unknown to the viewer on the sidewalk. Good b&w rendition, as that has a starkness that reveals contrasts that many color shots do not.

A Family Crisis:

Raghunandan tells a humorous story of a gathering at dinner with a ten-year old girl’s confession to her family of something not so scandalous as it at first seems. Knowing some of Raghunandan’s previous writing, I expected some kind of twist to this, and wasn’t disappointed. But just what it was turned out to be wholly unexpected, and a good surprise at the end.

Love deeper than the night:

A short verse, both poignant and economical in size, evokes love in one of its many forms using the metaphor of a strong caffeinated beverage to drive home its point.
Happy birthday to both Raghunandan and Sharmishtha this month! I’d like to offer my best to each of you on completion of another lucky trip around the Sun! May there be many more and be at least as good to you if not better! A happy birthday this month to actress Meryl Streep and to tennis player Leander Paes as well!

Gulzar:

As a songwriter, this man seems quite accomplished. I’ve listened to this: https://
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V1h_gfnGTZ0 from the movie Khamoshi. Lovely stuff, even without fully “getting” the lyrics. Then again, with his more playful approach to the lyricist’s art, maybe I’m missing the point! Another was here: https://www.youtube.com/
watch?v=Wu7JsGN2wHo

This month’s recipe,

for lobster curry, sounds absolutely delightful. Lobster is a treat for me, so this will be good for special occasions. I may be able to find many if not most of all of the ingredients in conventional grocery stores. I’ll gather those as they are available and I can competently prepare them, then cook this, maybe with the help of a local friend with experience in Indian cooking, and I think I know just who… *looks at Christopher in mind’s eye*

All peachy: All peachy on the desert front!

This looks like a fun story, with Mr. Green and Miss Grey, both misleading each other about their species in this cute little romance. I suppose there are benefits to avoiding a predator/prey relationship when it’s online and there would be that awkward incompatibility of species otherwise! This looks to me well worth the pitance of $1.00.

Bhandananda Uvach 2: Thus spake Hypocritananda:

A good point about government and the odd failure of politicians professing religious motivations who nonetheless act contrary to the actual teaching and values of the faith. I see the same thing here with American politics, though focused on pseudo-Evangelical Christianity rather than Hinduism.

Kagaje ankibuki – Lines on paper, and Kash – If only!

Beautiful verse the two of these, in both Bengali and Ingreji. Good use of form, economy of wording, and of course the ever-graceful Bangla script!

Rathyatra:

Interesting! I’ve seen some of the videos currently online, and here’s a link to one:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CFiQwPW7zpk I’ll warn you beforehand, there may be issues with getting this one to stream!

India this month:

With four festivals this month, including Rath Yatra, along with Eid ul Fitr, Gurupurnima, and Nagpanchami, there is much to celebrate. And though snakes are cool, I have more respect for teachers than I had in my school years, so Gurupurnima would probably the festival of choice!

Pieces of Past: Alexander’s Invasion:

Alexander was one of the more fascinating kings of his day. I’ll add that he was tutored by none other than the philosopher Aristotle himself, and may have furnished his old teacher with biological specimens of plants and animals from India as well as from his other conquests. I definitely agree that despite other mistakes by the British in India, unifying it under one administration was one of the good things they did!

Well, this concludes this months critique, and I’ll see you next with the reviews for Shraban, 1424!

Agnijaat Ashar (june) critique by Troy David Loy

Agnijaat Ashar 1424 Critique by Troy David Loy @ https://www.amazon.com/author/troyloy

Self Publishing Ideas 1 – choosing the platform:
This is a useful how-to for publishing things online yourself. I’ve never tried Createspace, as my first platform of choice was KDP. The former may be a good choice for any print works of mine. Must read more on formatting on both it and the latter during off hours!

Rani Durgavati:
The fact that this 16th Century queen fought and forced the retreat of a vastly more powerful foe as many as three times is a remarkable feat in itself, especially Akbar’s imperial forces. I noticed that in many places in history, killing oneself rather than surrender to an enemy with less than honorable treatment of prisoners, even brutal treatment, is arguably the better option. So it was with Durgabati.

Psychos and Morons:
Queries of phone hacking? It boggles the mind why anyone in their right mind and not working in a criminal organization or the Intelligence community would want to. Then again, this post is not titled Sane Folk and Geniuses, as the final two answers show.

These people need to “exploit” their own grey matter before asking this sort of thing in a public forum, much less expecting an answer.

Caste System 6:
The Authoress discusses the exploitation of certain castes for political gain and the decline of Indian intellectuals as a real force in governance and critical evaluation of policy. The control at the village level by politicians serves to cement this in expedient but unethical ways, and not for the long-term wellness of the state of the country.

That inner voice:
The Authoress discusses a phenomenon well-documented in the scientific literature: that there are thinking processes going on beneath the threshold of our conscious awareness. And this thinking can make itself known through vague feelings of wrongness or sudden awareness of things not previously known or thought, but often verifiable when investigated carefully. If it’s knowable then it can be shown. Scientific skeptics (skeptics who are scientific, as opposed to those who merely “skeptical” of
science) are familiar with this as well, and stage conjurors skilled in mentalism use this in their performances.

BAKHTI SAINTS: Ramananda – Glimpses of Indian History:
Being one of the most influential religious leaders of his day, one who contributed to not just one, but TWO religions is a remarkable achievement. His use of common language in preaching was evidently an effective way of getting his message to those he wanted most to receive it. The fact that he chose devotion to Rama and Sita over Vishnu is MOST interesting as well.

Nature @Kolkata in Ashar:
The Authoress notes the recent monsoon season and general trend toward cooler weather in Bengal. Of Interest are the festivals this month, Rathyatra and Eid ul Fitr, as well are mentioned Nagpanchami and Gurupurnima, those last two noted in previous issues of the Twins.

INDIAN RAGA NOW:
A critique of popular Bengali and Hindi music as the state of those arts currently stands. Some of it good, some of it less so, often MUCH less so, as trends have gone on since the Seventies. Something work considering when buying albums online.

SPOTLIGHT ON – Gheorghe Zamfir:
Pan flutes are cool, and this artist plays one. It was well worth the brief instant invested to check him out…Oh, LOOK! Here’s a link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?
v=1mHuf8owjoQ Give it a listen, as the music is incredible.

Window to West – Beauty and the Beast:
I’ve yet to see this myself, but worth buying online, and I’ve a good idea where…The Authoress discusses briefly the actors and feel of the movie. I must watch!

Sweet Memories – Sharmishtha Basu Day: The Day of the Lotus – Happy Sharmishtha Basu Day: A prayer and poem celebrating the Authoress by one gregory57 of intentblog.com

Runaway:
A cow debates an egret on the wisdom of escape from his owner, with the egret having the sounder reasoning.

actual culprit:
Never steal snake eggs using a proxy, as this tale suggests, especially magical ones whose mothers are protective of their eggs! Steal once, pay twice!

With the theme this month being summer, there are seven items: a brief poem; a digital painting reminding me of a boy with surfboard at shore; a diamond verse with something delicious (Mango icecream!); a 7 x 2 diamond verse reprimanding the Sun for being a jerk; a short story about nasty shapeshifting critters and the error of dismissing the advice of elders (There’s a reason they get to be old!); a longer verse on the heat and misery of summer heat in the city; and finally, a short but succinct essay on four causes of summer annoyance in Kolkata. Quite good!

That’s it for the month! I’ll see you soon, for Shraban, 1424!

Thursday Rhymes 10.8.17

In the pitch dark
A dog barks at distance,
His sound reassures not feeble hearts,
But spreads a tinge of uneasiness,
Wondering what is he barking at,
Something human or inhuman,
The fireflies glow in darkness
Like distant stars in faraway sky.
Far away on the river bank
A funeral pyre burns,
The chanting of the party
Sends a shiver down the spine,
The wind rustles the bamboo grove
It sounds like thousand whispers
A leaf rustles a leaf falls, another brushes body
As if thousands of ghosts encroach upon him
From all sides, hidden in pitch darkness,
He pulls his tattered blanket around his body
And waits for morning light!
When everything will be normal again,
The birds will sing and sun will shine,
Dispersing the terrors of night,
Now he waits and prays
That all his fears are baseless
And those are just leaves and wind,
And fireflies, not specters of the night
Closing upon him as he lays
Huddled in his tattered sheet
Waiting for the morning.